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inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
. act the work, he was jailed and stabbed, and killed at 39. mr. mandela struggling he was jailed for 27 years. and choosing reconciliation over retribution. so they both have that moral character about them. mr. obama, on the other hand, he was a benefactor. so he come as generation behind, but dr. kick, and mr. mandela, and and drink king were also trance forty figures. >> we just saw a picture of you, with one of my colleague morgan ratford who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew? >> your know, i must say when i was in cape town south africa, my son and i met him at the door, and he immediately recognized me and called my name. i was just overwhelmed. he knew what was going on. he was alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day. he at was a great debate. every time we have a private conversation whether it's my office or my home, they always were overwhelmed by the and breadth of his concerning interest. he also did not owe his politics because of his popularity. he kept reaching out to cuba, and castro, and why are you
that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world, threats are always evolving. we were protecting networks, then we were protecting the transfer of data, today, it's evolved to , finance, and military missions. constantly innovating to advance the front line in the cyber battle wherever it takes us. of performance. northrop grumman. additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. providedl funding is annenbergndation foundation, corporation for broadcasting and contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once ag
at the south african embassy in washington. >> mr. mandela left a global legacy just from the reaction globally to his death, but you can't not be shocked. you can't the be sad. >> reporter: south african ambassador to the u.s. receiving the news from mandela's daughter. >> she knows how important the united states is to the mandela family and to south africa because it was here that so much happened where people marched for our freedom, were arrested for our freedom and that is why that statue is there. >> his ideas will live on. they will never die. >> reporter: people are meeting inside the embassy planning on events in the district to pay a proper tribute to nelson mandela. at the south african embassy on massachusetts avenue in northwest, surae chinn, wusa9. >> you can submit your videos, your photos, your remembrances of nelson mandela on our website, that's where you will also find world reaction to his death along with some of the former south african leader's most memorable quotes. >>> d.c. police chief cathy lanier says there is no connection between a pair of alleged
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or
the prime minister of new zealand, john key wrote, mr. mandela was a force for change not only in south africa, but around the world. reacting tonight, muhammad ali wrote, his was a spirit born free. destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. new york's cardinal dolan wrote, nelson mandela was a hero to the world. his bravery in defending human rights against the great evil of apartheid made him a symbol of courage and dignity as well as an inspiration to people everywhere. and mandela's great friend, archbishop foundation wrote in his name his fearless generosity and leadership were in the service of transcending our differences by seeking our oneness as human beings. and here's the "new york" magazine cover, a tribute to the young mandela, young freedom fighter. tonight, bono, mandela's great supporter and friend wrote, in the end, nelson mandela showed us how to love rather than hate, not because he never surrendered to rage or violence but because he learned love would do a better job. >> andrea mitchell in our d.c.
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup soccer tournament. decades in prison and insist ens on forgiveness made him a potent symbol of the struggle to end the country's domination and power of peaceful resolution in even the conflicts. we are joined now on the live line, mrs. smith. a difficult day, one we had been informed would be coming. that doesn't make it easier. >> i think south africans are pleased. [ inaudible ] he was a healthy man the most of his life. the last year was painful for him. >> we've clearly lost the connection with mrs. smith her authorized biographer. she was spea
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
the u.s. to pose sanctions. let's roll video of mr. mandela. he was africa's former president who helped break the country system of racial discrimination. he died this evening, age 95. south african president jacob zuma announced the death at a somber news conference. people are coming here to the south african embassy to pay tribute to mandela. we are going to hear from a 12-year-old girl. she walked here with her father and here is what she had to say. >> i want to pray for his family, him and all the people that are suffering for his loss. i like to say thank you for him and everything he did for us. >> reporter: back out here live, you can see the south african embassy here, the statue and there is a lot of media here. we are in very tight quarters, which is why my voice is lowered. a lot of folks from the local stations, you have international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted t
square. mr. mandela's host on that day was the mayor of bedford, councillor carole ellis. sadly, councillor ellis is seriously ill at present, but i know that she is so proud of her own and of bedford's part in mr. mandela's story. between 1986 and 1990, the right honorable gentleman member for bermondsey and old southwark , i and peter pike, the former member for burnley, made three visits to south africa at the invitation of the followers of christ working for a peaceful resolution of the situation there. on our return from our first visit, on june 17, we made joint speeches in a debate here in the house of commons, referring to each other as our honorable friends -- a point duly noted by hansard. we had gone together -- safety in numbers -- at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation was deteriorating, violence was abroad, and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything but very polarised information. we were able to report back to our respective party leaders on what we found. i had half an hour with an anxious, worried, an
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
coming here throughout the past few days since mr. mandela's death was announced. they have been singing in the streets, they have been chanting. it's been more street party than anything else celebrating the life of mr. mandela. obviously there's also some grief and mourning but most people are trying to focus on the positive, the legacy and the tremendous achievement of mr. mandela and this country during his life. also you have to remember that all these events are taking place over a week. there's the memorial service tomorrow and then for the next three days after that, mandela's body will lie in state at the union builds, the seat of government in pretoria and the body will make a procession from the military hospital to that place each day so there will be people trying to line that route and see what's happening as well to visit the body and pay their respects. and finally the funeral in a distant part of the country where mr. mandela is from, so many events over many days and a lot of emotion overall that. >> ron, thank you. checking the news feed this morning, that massive wint
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
at madison park high school when mandela arrived. >> mr. nelson mandela. [ cheers ] >> reporter: inside the school, pure excitement. >> you all have filled our hearts. >> reporter: this man was a student there. >> 23 years later i still remember that day as if it were yesterday. you heard about this guy in history and suddenly, you know, he's coming to your high school. it was a surreal moment. >> reporter: in detroit -- ♪ >> reporter: -- tens of thousands flocked to tiger stadium. owen beaver was in the motor city. >> i met him for the first time. i got to tell you, we embraced. >> reporter: it was a whirlwind trip. 8 cities, 12 days. stops in miami, los angeles, washington, d.c., and atlanta. >> to be so young and to meet a leader as great as mandela was a really big moment. >> reporter: this woman was just 10 years old at the time, on the tarmac in atlanta. >> i just remember looking in his face. even as young as i was, i remember thinking just what a kindness there was about him and his eyes thinking how amazing it was for somebody who had been through so much to not have a harden
, he has a very close relationship with nelson mand a mandela. their lives are intertwined. mr. obama has said that his first political act as an individual was in support oh of the anti apartheid movement, which mr. mandela, of course, was leading. so there's that. we expect that this could be one of the largest gatherings of heads of states ever together assembled in one place. it's an event that will perhaps rival the funeral of pope john paul ii back in 2005. some 3 million converged upon the vatican. the numbers here at the football stadium where the main event will be held could be as many as 100,000 or so. there are several other venues in the johannesburg area where people will watch on giant televisions. and countless others will cram the streets to get near this area where there will be this huge event going on. and don't forget, after tomorrow, there are still three days of official mourning, where mandela's body will lie in state at the union buildings at the capital. and a final state funeral in qunu where mr. mandela was born and grew up. a week-long series of events, fu
mandela was released from prison in 1992. am i correct, mr. mayor? >> absolutely, derek. my relationship goes before then, one thanksgiving day we sat in at the south african embassy on massachusetts avenue starting a whole movement and on april 4th of thsame year out of that 5,000 d.c. government employees off on administrative leave to go protest and my wife said they were arrested and the first time nelson mandela was freed and came to washington he was my guest. i met him over at the convention center for a big rally movement, gave him keys to the city and so he meant a lot to me, not just as a heroic person, but personally. then in august of last 2006 mayor williams took a delegation to south africa and i visited his home and on that wall was a proclamation from me to him and so we go back. mandela was remarkable. anybody who has been in jail for 27 years and not come out bitter is a big man. i doubt if i could do that. stay in jail for 27 years and come out and be better and not bitter. >> i suppose that's why people marvel so much about nelson mandela's personal character. council
the thought originated. in the mind of mr. mandela and bishop desmond tutu, it was the recognition from our side and on the side of mr. mandela and his colleagues that to continue our hostilities and acrimony would mean the destruction of this country and would lead to a civil war that no one would wish to go. >> reporter: as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace predated the '90s in the early '60s following years of action against apartheid he made his famous speech at the dock that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said, i afford against white domination. and i afford against black domination. i have challenged the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. and then he concluded by saying, this is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i'm prepared to die. >> reporter: mandela was an icon. but he had a very human side, too. as botha was to find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> mandela is no angel. no humans are angels. his secon
. this is not unexpected given mr. mandela's house. we might ask now how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: richard, news of nelson mandela's death was announced just before midnight. so inevitably still today many of south africans are still learning the news that the father of this nation passed away during the evening. here his suburban home in johannesburg many hundreds of people have come. the mood here is not somber at all, though. there have been very few people here in tears. people have come to celebrate his life and the lives that they've been able to achieve and to live as a result of his sacrifice. people here also wondering precisely what happens next, and we're awaiting details in the next few hours about a lying in state and about nelson mandela's burial, which once diplomats are saying that the plan resembled the biggest state funeral for any former leader south of winston churchill. >> thank you. rohi for us in south africa. now to nbc's brian williams with a look at mandela's incredible life and unwavering spirit. >> to deny any person human rights is the challenge of very humanit
people to hold daily protests at the south african embassy in washington. >> mr. mandela has had global action. you cannot be shocked and cannot be sad. >> reporter: south african ambassador to the us received the news from zinzi, mandela's daughter. >> she knows how important the united states is to the mandela family and south africa, because it was here that so much happened where people marched for our freedom, were arrested for our freedom, and that is why that statue is there. >> his ideas will live on and never die. >> reporter: people are meeting inside the embassy planning on events in the district to pay a property tribute to nelson mandela. at the south africa embassy, saray, wusa 9. >> if the national cathedral agrees there will be a memorial service there on wednesday. the condolence book is going to be open to the public daily, and there will also be nightly vigils from 7:00-8:00 p.m. at the embassy. >> in the audience, it was electrifying. people were cheering, just about every word that he said about his experience, and the way in which there was that parallel between
, nelson mandela will be laid to rest in south africa on december 15th. president and mrs. obama will be there to pay their respects. fox's ed henry just wrapped up an interview with bill clinton be who shared his memories of the leader. >> he talked to me in that prison cell as we grabbed the bars and looked out together about what it was like. and i said tell me how this changed you. how did you give up 27 of the best years of your life and come out a better man than you went? he said, i realized they could take everything from me except my mind and my heart. those things i would have to give them. he decided not to give them away. he was free before he was released. >> tributes have been pouring in over the last 24 hours. >> we've lost one of the most influential courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with us on this earth. >> extremely sad and traj ek news. we're just reminded what an extraordinarily inspiring man nelson mandela was and my thoughts and prayers are with him and his family now. >> a new low, low, low, loss of pain. he accompl
, a large, richly furnished tome i've been lucky enough to enter many times to film mr. mandela, the former president was surrounded by family members as he passed away. it's widely believed that elders from his home village, he was after all, a deeply traditional man, are now going through rituals in english the ceremony they are going through is called the closing of the eyes. it will last several hours during this night. there are many tears in many countless eyes in africa today. mr. mandela always had a smile and a joke when he met people. i was fortunate he asked me eight years ago to come and be his personal vid yeographer. he got a joke out of nothing each time he saw me. he once saw me with a group of women on one occasion and he came over and whispered, lucky you. he turned to me and says, paul, is this the car i came in? well he's going on a journey now. and after up to two weeks of ceremonies it will end up with him being laid to rest, greta. >> you know, we hear about him being humble. none of us knew him personally. we look at the things he has done this his life. but he tonig
sanctions was the beginning of the he said. i met with mrs. thatchter day before mandela was set free and britain never broke from apartheid south africa. but the u.s. played the most significant role of any. i think, i was listening to brother doug speak. he chose a critical point. he had a chance for a very bloody south africa. but the unfinished business. and i think that reconciliation over retribution. we had a conversation about two years ago. we were talking. he said he had been the military leader. he felt nonviolence would not work there. he planned to blow up a hospital in desperation. he was captured just before that happened. he is glad he got caught. he would rather have spent 27 years in jail than to have the blood on his hands of innocent people. to me that is quintessentially him. he also made some tough decisions politically about his allies. he reached out to cuba. he reach out to libya. he tried to bring a nonaligned mission. ted global vision and very principled stands on those issues. >> and president obama only met nelson mandela once, i believe. there did seem t
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. an indescribable moment. his walk to freedom after year in the robin island prison. he stepped into the waiting arms of his family and the joyous expectations of an entire country. >> i cherish the idea of a new soh . >> reporter: mandela not only became the first south african black president, but he won the nobel peace prize after putting aside his feelings for his former jailers and inviting them home. >> i have fought against the white domination, and i have fought very firmly against that domination. >> reporter: nelson mandela's given name translates as troublemaker. it was a teacher who changed it to nelson as the young mandela grew up if a privileged home and was first a lawyer, representing blacks forced off their land, but his nonviolent apartide opposition ended foo after 69 peaceful black protesters were slaughtered by the police in what was knowns at sharkville massacre. >> there's many people who feel it's fruitless for us to continue to talk about peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela was the lawyer was mandela the fre
of mr. mandela. that to continue our -- and echo them, would mean the destruction of this. it would mean to a civil war that no one would to go. >> as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace following years of action against apartheid, he made his famous speech that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said that i have fought against one domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the idea of democratic and free society. all lift together and with equal opportunities. and then he concludes by saying this is the idea, i have to live for and to achieve. but it needs to be, it is an ideal for what i'm prepared to die. >> mandela was an icon, but he had a very human side, too, as botha would find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> the second -- i think in march 1996 and got a message that he felt extremely lonely. so i phoned and he answered the phone. not the secretary. and i then conveyed my condolences and we -- to absorb this event now. and no empathy, friendship, only time first time he started to stop and he's a human be
york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured a right of human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell in washington. he was his nation's great emancipator. south african, the born-free generation who never lived under apartheid are celebrating the life of nelson mandela. prisoner, revolutionary, father of a rainbow nation. michelle kosinski is live outside mandela's residence. michelle, this has been an all night, all day celebration, joyous celebration of mandela's life. >> it's just been incredible. you go through the crowd and you see the mix of people, all walks of life. we've seen babies and very old, black and white, really all races and faiths. people are gathered along a fence here outside of mandela's property. this morning it was a bare fence. this morning it is covered with flowers. the procession of people up and down the street has been absolutely nonstop. you
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
's death on thursday. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared for his lying in state later this week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service in johannesburg. >>> number five, police are searching for four people believed to be behind the killing of an american school teacher. officials say 33-year-old ronnie smith was gunned down while he was jogging in the libyan city of benghazi on thursday. smith moved to libya just about a year and a half ago. he was teaching there. he was planning to return home to his family this month. >>> merrill newman, a veteran of the korean war, 85 years old, is back to see his family today. cnn's paula hancocks in seoul looks at newman's role in the korean conflict. >> reporter: putting on military fatigues in seoul, former members talk about the korean war. now in their 80s, these men were part of an anti-militant guerilla group. they say released american citizen merrill newman was one of their leaders. newman used to send orders to us indicating which island to infiltrate and occupy. then used to work on combined operat
before his burial. >> mr. mandela is also being remembered in the bay area. kpix5 shows us the celebration of mandela's life and legacy at a bay area church. >> reporter: when san francisco's glide memorial church remembered nelson mandela at their morning services the only thing missing was sadness. the mood was joyful as a children's choir honored the passing of the man being called the father of a nation. >> it's bigger than that. i mean, nelson mandela touched all of our lives regardless of where we were in the world. >> pastor williams met mandela twice, the first time at his celebrated appearance in oakland in 1990. williams says mandela's power came from his ability to rise above the outrage of his imprisonment, to become an irresistible force for peaceful change in the tradition of ghandi and dr. martin luther king jr.. >> being in prison for 27 years, you hear me? 27 years and then walking out of that prison as a new person completely. there's no doubt about it, he liberated the world in many ways. >> mandela was already in his 70s when he walked out of prison but
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
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